Coverage for Floods: The Leading Cause of Property Damage

Man sweeping flood debris

Ever-changing weather patterns, along with over-development and the leveling of forests, have reduced the land’s natural ability to absorb water. And the results are costly – including a flood risk for many, even those who don’t live near the water!

During a 30-year mortgage, your home has a 26 percent chance of experiencing a flood compared to only a 4 percent chance of a fire. Between 20 and 25 percent of flood insurance claims come from a medium or low flood-risk area, and the sad truth is that the damage left behind is not insured.

Fortunately, many communities in the United States participate in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Chances are excellent that flood insurance will be available to protect your home or business and its contents.

You can learn more about flood insurance from an experienced Endline/Pike agent. It is an affordable alternative to the costs of cleanup and chaos that the next disaster is waiting to bring.

Curious to see your flood risk? Visit fema.gov to learn more about the National Flood Insurance Program.

Walking in snowy flood waters

Snow Melt

The Great Midwestern Flood of 1993 lasted more than four months, ruined 49,000 homes, and caused at least $16 billion in property damage.

Source: The 1993 Great Midwest Flood: Voices 10 Years Later; FEMA 2003

Row of summer houses

New Development

Construction and development can change natural drainage and create new flood risks.

Source: FEMA News Release 1530-027, August 2004

Flood cresting a levee

Dams/Levees

According to the National Inventory of Dams, there are more than 74,000 dams in the United States. Of those, nearly one-third poses a significant risk to life and property if they collapse. Additionally, extreme flooding can overtop levees and floodwalls.

Source: National Inventory of Dams, 1994

Driving in a flood

Flash Flood

Flash floods are the top weather-related killer in the United States. They can roll boulders, tear out trees, and destroy buildings and bridges.

Source: NOAA National Weather Service, February 2006

Hurricane from space

Tropical Storm

Inland flooding from tropical storms can be a major threat to communities hundreds of miles from the coast.

Source: FEMA Press Release 1536-027, September 2004